iTEM Project Webinar in Mathematics Education

Teaching Methods (Problem Based Learning, Flipped Classroom)

Real Life Problems Linked with Fundamental Mathematics

Technology & Simulation

Preparation Supportive Modules

 

Book the date 16th of Oct. in Zoom

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Webinar in Mathematics Education

The iTEM Project: Help Students to Realize the Mathematics Power in their studies & careers

16th of October in Zoom, starting at 1430 CET

The majority of students in Europe and not only have not realized and appreciate the importance of Mathematics in explaining the real world and solving the most important challenges our civilization faces. To tackle this issue is of high priority to change / to modify the way we teach Mathematics: use real-life problems that can be tackled using fundamental Mathematics, employ during our lectures simulations that link fundamental mathematical parameters with measurable quantities, and employ modern teaching techniques that cultivate the soft skills requested in order to build ‘active’ learners.

This Webinar is very much aligned with the actions of the iTEM project (item.chania.teicrete.gr) and will provide a fast review regarding actions that address the aforementioned proposals. The topics will be presented along this training event will be:

  • Modern Teaching - Student Oriented Methods along with Mathematics Education e.g. Problem Based Learning
  • Teaching Mathematics Strategies in the COVID-19 era e.g. MOOCs and Flipped Classrooms
  • How to teach Fundamental Mathematics with examples from real World
  • How to support weak students in Mathematics

The planned presentations target Math Teachers but also students that want to discover ‘ Why do we learn Mathematics?

All the speakers are experienced scientists and teachers in the topics the webinar will present; the speakers come from the Academia and Industry as well

This Webinar takes place also on the frame of the HMU actions to celebrate the Erasmus Days 2020. We hope that you will be with us on the 16th of October (starting at 1430 CET)

Organizers of the Webinar

petrid

Dr. Konstantinos Petridis 

Director of the International Relations Office

Hellenic Mediterranean University, Greece

c.petridischania[at]gmail[dot]com

 

image

Mr. Ricardo Tavio 

Director of the EVM, Spain

Dr. Nuno Escudeiro

Dr. Nuno Escudeiro

Scientific Coordinator of ATHENA European University

Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Portugal

Bolanakis Nikolaos

Mr. Nikolaos Bolanakis

Ph.D. Candidate, Technical Support 

Hellenic Mediterranean University, Greece

Presenters of Webinar

Their affiliation and their talks are presented below

Εικόνα1

Dr. Justo López Palomo

Maths applications to business environments: 2 case studies overview

Register to webinar until the 14th of October 2020

For the speakers!

You can download the presentation template by clicking the button below.

Supported by

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Hellenic Mediterranean University (Greece)

(Organizer)

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EVM (Spain)

(Organizer)

athena

ATHENA

European University Consortium (Organizer)

ULL

Universidad de La Laguna (Spain)

(Constributor)

KarlstadUniversity-Logotype (1)

Karlstads University (Sweden)

(Contributor)

AAU_LOGO_RGB_UK (1)

Aalborg University (Denmark)

(Contributor)

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University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology (Austria)

(Contributor)

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Institute Polytechnic da Porto (Portugal)

(Contributor)

Hadassah logoNew-02

Hadassah Academic College Jerusalem (Israel)

(Contributor)

Wolfram

WolframAlpha Computational Intelligence

(Contributor)

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Holon Instritute of Technology (Israel)

(Contributor)

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University of Edimburgh (Scotland)

(Contributor)

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Univesity of Montreal (Canada)

Contributor

iTEM Logo (1)

Erasmus Capacity Building Project

Innovative Teaching Education in Mathematics

(Funder)

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Erasmus Capacity Building Project

Applied Curricula in Technology for East Africa

(Funder)

CRETE Project Logo (1)

Critical Skills for Electronic Engineers of 2020

An Erasmus Plus Strategic Partnership Project

(Funder)

LogoIKY

State Scholarship Foundation (IKY)

(Funder)

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The webinar will be streamed through Zoom. An invitation will be sent to all the registered participants. For any information please contact Dr. Konstantinos Petridis (c.petridis@hmu.gr)

 

Polya proposes to follow five general steps when solving a mathematical problem: understand the problem, devise a plan, carry out the plan, and look back the result. In this webinar we will talk about a fifth step, or an extended fourth step, which refers to posing new problems or new questions that allow us to make deeper mathematical knowledge from a proposed problem. In addition, we will show an example where the use of technology allow us to ask new mathematical questions and get a deepen mathematical knowledge.

Polya proposes to follow five general steps when solving a mathematical problem: understand the problem, devise a plan, carry out the plan, and look back the result. In this webinar we will talk about a fifth step, or an extended fourth step, which refers to posing new problems or new questions that allow us to make deeper mathematical knowledge from a proposed problem. In addition, we will show an example where the use of technology allow us to ask new mathematical questions and get a deepen mathematical knowledge.

In the talk, we plan to present an ongoing project concerning assessment in mathematics courses for first year engineering students. The project examines how the combined use of computer-aided assessment systems and dynamic mathematics software environments – both already widely used on their own – can support the development and assessment of higher-order mathematical skills by automating provision of appropriate feedback to students. A particular motivation for the project is the recognized challenge that many students experience when entering university mathematics courses. By developing design principles for innovative technology-rich teaching practices with a particular focus on feedback of high quality the project will address this issue.

In this talk, we introduce the Problem-Based Learning (PBL) pedagogy and how it can be applied in mathematics education. Then, we present how PBL and the flipped classroom instruction approach can be combined for engaging students in mathematics both in online and offline learning environments. Part of this presentation is based on the results of the FLIP2G Erasmus+ Knowledge Alliance (https://flip2g-project.eu/).

Our contribution presents combined student oriented teaching strategies applicable for face to face teaching – learning, but also the strategies we have to switch to when due to circumstances face to face teaching – learning fails to be used.

Our contribution presents combined student oriented teaching strategies applicable for face to face teaching – learning, but also the strategies we have to switch to when due to circumstances face to face teaching – learning fails to be used.

In this talk, I will introduce the concept of a Mathematics-with-Industry Day (called MiMM day) together with its purpose, ways to organize the event, as well as a couple of advantages and drawbacks we learned during the last 3 years. Examples of passed industrial problems can be seen at
https://www.kau.se/MIMM-day. All this is done in close collaboration with Dr. Elisabet Mellroth (Karlstad), a specialist in the mathematical education of gifted children.

When Wolfram Research pioneered the 'computation notebook' in the early '90s the vision was simply to enable the 'computational essay' -- the ability to mix inputs and outputs together with narrative text to better present mathematical ideas. In the years since, Wolfram have extended the idea of the unified notebook to support all of the key elements necessary to teach STEM subjects in any combination of pedagogical styles.

The talk will give simple examples of using Wolfram Notebook technology for MOOC style self-learn content, teacher led exploration materials, computer led practice, summative assessment collaborative essays and as a simple side-tool.

As well making it possible to mix or blur pedagogy styles within the same medium, the provision of professional computation to students enables non-traditional curriculum content. The talk will briefly discuss efforts at computerbasedmath.org to realize that opportunity.

The growing use of technology for mathematics in higher education opens new pedagogical and technological challenges for teachers. For centuries, mathematics has been associated with traditional blackboard teaching. Nowadays, teaching mathematics requires not only content knowledge, i.e. knowing what to teach, but also pedagogical knowledge, i.e. knowing how to teach and how to deal with students’ problems and learning difficulties (Yigit, 2014). Additionally, teachers should have knowledge of the appropriate educational technologies and their potential. The use of technologies in mathematics teaching and learning can be classified in two dimensions: the use of domain-specific mathematics tools (e.g. GeoGebra); and the general use of learning technologies and online tools (e.g. Moodle) (Crawford, Abdulwahed, & Jaworski, 2012). Education and technology have become two interdependent concepts in mathematics education (Kirikçilar & Yildiz, 2018). The Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework can be used to describe what teachers need to know to successfully integrate technology into teaching mathematics.
The Erasmus+ CBHE project ITEM aims at improving mathematics teaching practice in higher education by applying innovative instructional approaches. ITEM aims to train teachers in the use of educational technologies (learning management systems, dynamic learning tools such as GeoGebra, Desmos, etc.) related to mathematics teaching. Therefore, we aimed to explore teaching approaches and technology-related pedagogical competencies among mathematics teachers involved in the ITEM project to be able to prepare well-tailored training programs for mathematics teachers within ITEM.
We analyzed teaching approaches and technology-related pedagogical competencies of 29 mathematics teachers from nine European countries. We conducted interviews and applied the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI-16) and the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework survey.
In that webinar, we would present the TPACK framework as a framework that can be used to describe what teachers need to know to integrate technology into teaching mathematics and we will also present the results of the survey.

Teaching mathematics in the 21st century: lessons from an implementation of an integrated approach.
It is well known that first year mathematic courses are often a stumbling block for STEM students. One of the reasons is that the students do not appreciate the relevance of the material in these courses for their field of studies and in consequence lack the motivation to spend time mastering it. In this talk we will sketch iTEM’s integrated approach to address this problem: introducing the material through real life examples, frequent testing to provide students with immediate feedback, learning in pairs, early identification of students in danger of falling behind. We will share our experience from the first implementation at Hadassah Academic College, our initial conclusions and our plans for the future.

Teaching mathematics in the 21st century: lessons from an implementation of an integrated approach.
It is well known that first year mathematic courses are often a stumbling block for STEM students. One of the reasons is that the students do not appreciate the relevance of the material in these courses for their field of studies and in consequence lack the motivation to spend time mastering it. In this talk we will sketch iTEM’s integrated approach to address this problem: introducing the material through real life examples, frequent testing to provide students with immediate feedback, learning in pairs, early identification of students in danger of falling behind. We will share our experience from the first implementation at Hadassah Academic College, our initial conclusions and our plans for the future.

In the talk, we plan to present an ongoing project concerning assessment in mathematics courses for first year engineering students. The project examines how the combined use of computer-aided assessment systems and dynamic mathematics software environments – both already widely used on their own – can support the development and assessment of higher-order mathematical skills by automating provision of appropriate feedback to students. A particular motivation for the project is the recognized challenge that many students experience when entering university mathematics courses. By developing design principles for innovative technology-rich teaching practices with a particular focus on feedback of high quality the project will address this issue.

In this talk I will discuss practical methods for assessing mathematical proof online, using the STACK online assessment system. This will include the use of faded worked examples and reading comprehension questions to understand proof. By breaking down a given proof, we formulate a checklist that can be used to generate comprehension questions which can be assessed automatically online. I will discuss some preliminary results of deploying such questions.

Research about the mathematical needs (and their use of mathematics) of both engineering students and engineers in the working place is one of the areas of research in university mathematics education that has attracted increasing interest in the last ten years. Research has reported on the difficulties engineering students face in relating the content of their mathematics courses to what is taught in their professional courses. Moreover, research seems to indicate that, in particular, calculus is not very prevalent in the engineering workplace or in professional engineering courses. One way to address difficulties with mathematics courses is by better understanding how mathematical notions are used in professional engineering courses. In this presentation we will offer an overview of research on difficulties with mathematics courses in engineering, as well as some interventions and suggestions of activities for these courses.

How can a lecturer make large mathematics lectures more engaging without interrupting her/his normal way of teaching? In this talk, I will discuss a variety of short and practical activities that a lecturer can implement during a lecture without the need of restructuring the organization of a classroom. These practices will be particularly useful for lecturers wishing to try out new ideas without the pressure of taking radical decisions.

After many years of tutoring and much more of being tutored Mathematics we still try to find the best way of triggering the Math instinct of students and even of ourselves. Especially when new fields of mathematics arise in our common lives. Thousands of books, lectures, ppt’s, pdf’s, guides, videos and tutorials exist. But always at the end, the feeling of trying to understand a cruel and hard symbolic language is there. We are only humans born and raised in a small 3D world, aiming to understand how living in the 4D space would be… while now scientists claim the existence of an infinity number of Dimensions. What should we expect from students having just adopted the math basis in school, now studying to get their diploma on applied sciences, or even from ourselves, since we just need Math to computationally approximate the multiphysics problems that other humans invent or discover day by day. We have not converged to the answer yet. In this lecture some of the mathematicians favorite stories and their creators will be presented. The work and the life of the protagonists has been proven to effect positively the audience and make people love the absolute and strict behavior of the cold-blooded Mathematics.